1774-07-11 JSC to SCC

Title

1774-07-11 JSC to SCC

Date

July 7, 1774

Subject

Letter

Source

Copley Family Papers, Library of Congress, Folder 1

Transcription

London July the 11th 1774
My ever Dear Sukey
I have now the pleasure to inform you I am in London & in Brother Joh:ns Lodgings till I can fix on those convenient for myself wich [^which] will be in a Day or two, being a Little fatigued with my Voyage & Journey and several things to provide I shall rest myself today at home this day or rather gratify myself in one of the first & greatest pleasures I shall find while absent from you, that of writing to you. I learn a Vessell will sail tomorrow from this so that if she has as good a passage as I have [^been] be bless’d with you will soon hear of my arrival. I left a latter with Capt. Robson at Dover in which I have given a particular account of my Voyage, as I suppose he will send it by the same opportunity that I send this by I will not repeat its contents in this. I have not yet seen anything scarcely of this Superb City, tho What I have seen only convinces me I was not mistaken in [^my Ideas of] its grandeur. That part of the Country through which I passed is surprisingly Beautifull, & I cannot but infer from what I observed that Mr - - G - - was greatly mistaken when he said we were Saints & Angels [in America superscript] compared to those that inhabit this Country – for it is certain with us [that superscript] even good forces will not secure the property of the Farmer from being trespassed on in the most shamefull manner at the same time in [this?] 72 Miles of the most publick Road in England [^through which I passed] you will see miles together of Grain, Beans, Grass, [^& c.] without any fence or hedge & through which a neat smooth Road is cut of no great width – only just sufficient for two Carriags to pass & yet not a spore of Grass, Grain, or Beans, trampled no more than if such a trespass would be instant Distruction to the offender Every house is neat tho [ever?] so poor and the Ground round it, really we Americans seem not halfway remove’d from a state of nature when brought into comparison with those of this Country in their manner of living nor do I find in the Country the traviling so dear as I see [^thought] it was you will be your own Judge [^in] of this matter when I inform you my whole expence in coming 72 Miles amounted to 3 Guineas, my being at the same time as good in all things & as Genteel as any Gentleman would wish and my Carriage as Genteel as any Charriots that are in Boston the Horses of the [^same] quality [^with the Carriages in pain? of goodness] with a Postillion the Carriage & Horses are changed every stage, I think Major Paddock would [^not] furnish this Carriage for the Money exclusive of the Expences on the Road & I am sure his is not so genteal as those I rode in, as to the Horses there is no comparison to be made between them, & this Road is the dearest to travil in throughout England & at Canterbury I was entertained with a sight of the Gothick Cathedral built by 4 Saxson Kings this is a very curious Building and contains several Monuments no less so, but here I must end my Discription till I have seen something more which I expect will be this Afternoon or tomorrow at farthest, Governor Hutchinson is to be here at 1 oClock when I shall have the pleasure of seeing him as he is now coming I must break off --

I did not intend adding anything more to this Letter but must must just desire you to give my Dear Baby’s a Kiss of the tenderest love [illeg.] lett Betsey [missing word—know?] I shall send her something that is pretty soon I hope Readman goes on well in his Garden & c. I design writing this Afternoon to Brother Harry I therefore conclude with wishing you all Felicity Such a separation will admit of to so endearing a Wife

I am my ever dear Sukey
with an affection not to be lessned
by the distance I may be at
or the amusements of I may meet with
Your sincere &
Loving Husband
John Singleton Copley
PS I desire you will remember me to all our Friends in a sutable [^manner] as they stand connected in Relationship Friendship, & c. [illeg.] I hope all in our own House is well for I consider all worthy our notice while they Act in a proper manner in their several Stations



[Address] For
Mrs. Susanna Copley

[Docket] London July 11. 1774
Mr. Copley’s Letter

Text

London July the 11th 1774
My ever Dear Sukey
I have now the pleasure to inform you I am in London & in Brother Joh:ns Lodgings till I can fix on those convenient for myself wich [^which] will be in a Day or two, being a Little fatigued with my Voyage & Journey and several things to provide I shall rest myself today at home this day or rather gratify myself in one of the first & greatest pleasures I shall find while absent from you, that of writing to you. I learn a Vessell will sail tomorrow from this so that if she has as good a passage as I have [^been] be bless’d with you will soon hear of my arrival. I left a latter with Capt. Robson at Dover in which I have given a particular account of my Voyage, as I suppose he will send it by the same opportunity that I send this by I will not repeat its contents in this. I have not yet seen anything scarcely of this Superb City, tho What I have seen only convinces me I was not mistaken in [^my Ideas of] its grandeur. That part of the Country through which I passed is surprisingly Beautifull, & I cannot but infer from what I observed that Mr - - G - - was greatly mistaken when he said we were Saints & Angels [in America superscript] compared to those that inhabit this Country – for it is certain with us [that superscript] even good forces will not secure the property of the Farmer from being trespassed on in the most shamefull manner at the same time in [this?] 72 Miles of the most publick Road in England [^through which I passed] you will see miles together of Grain, Beans, Grass, [^& c.] without any fence or hedge & through which a neat smooth Road is cut of no great width – only just sufficient for two Carriags to pass & yet not a spore of Grass, Grain, or Beans, trampled no more than if such a trespass would be instant Distruction to the offender Every house is neat tho [ever?] so poor and the Ground round it, really we Americans seem not halfway remove’d from a state of nature when brought into comparison with those of this Country in their manner of living nor do I find in the Country the traviling so dear as I see [^thought] it was you will be your own Judge [^in] of this matter when I inform you my whole expence in coming 72 Miles amounted to 3 Guineas, my being at the same time as good in all things & as Genteel as any Gentleman would wish and my Carriage as Genteel as any Charriots that are in Boston the Horses of the [^same] quality [^with the Carriages in pain? of goodness] with a Postillion the Carriage & Horses are changed every stage, I think Major Paddock would [^not] furnish this Carriage for the Money exclusive of the Expences on the Road & I am sure his is not so genteal as those I rode in, as to the Horses there is no comparison to be made between them, & this Road is the dearest to travil in throughout England & at Canterbury I was entertained with a sight of the Gothick Cathedral built by 4 Saxson Kings this is a very curious Building and contains several Monuments no less so, but here I must end my Discription till I have seen something more which I expect will be this Afternoon or tomorrow at farthest, Governor Hutchinson is to be here at 1 oClock when I shall have the pleasure of seeing him as he is now coming I must break off --

I did not intend adding anything more to this Letter but must must just desire you to give my Dear Baby’s a Kiss of the tenderest love [illeg.] lett Betsey [missing word—know?] I shall send her something that is pretty soon I hope Readman goes on well in his Garden & c. I design writing this Afternoon to Brother Harry I therefore conclude with wishing you all Felicity Such a separation will admit of to so endearing a Wife

I am my ever dear Sukey
with an affection not to be lessned
by the distance I may be at
or the amusements of I may meet with
Your sincere &
Loving Husband
John Singleton Copley
PS I desire you will remember me to all our Friends in a sutable [^manner] as they stand connected in Relationship Friendship, & c. [illeg.] I hope all in our own House is well for I consider all worthy our notice while they Act in a proper manner in their several Stations



[Address] For
Mrs. Susanna Copley

[Docket] London July 11. 1774
Mr. Copley’s Letter

Files

1774-07-11 JSC to SCC.pdf

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“1774-07-11 JSC to SCC,” Omeka at Brandeis, accessed October 22, 2020, https://omeka.lts.brandeis.edu/items/show/2.

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